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Letterpress Depot

APA Retrogoose Recap

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APA Retrogoose Recap

What a feast of friendship, type, talk and memories. The APA RetroGoose is over but not all the good feelings it left behind. Over 40 APA members and several spouses came from around the country, joined by a strong network of Colorado printers….

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Raising the beast out of its cave

I found the little town in northeast Iowa easy enough, but had some difficulty finding the gravel road that led into the country, to the old farmhouse of the Stromberg family, where my printing press awaited.  

The weather-worn old farmer was sitting in his truck, waiting for me. The surrounding fields were chest high with corn, and the sturdy old family house was getting rough around the edges – a few broken windows, screen door flapping in the wind, tumbleweeds slapped against the barn. 

“We don’t live out here no more,” he said. “Grandpa was the printer, over in Elkader, and after he retired he kept a little shop in the cellar.”

We went around back, and he opened the cellar doors – old-style double doors that revealed concrete steps going down under the house. It was a dank, cobwebby place. Engine parts and tools were piled against the wall. Boxes and old furniture were stacked everywhere. Tom pulled a chain and a bare bulb illuminated the space.

“It’s over here,” he said, and shoved a dresser out of the way. Back in the corner, the iron beast with its big flywheel sat forlornly.

“Is this where he did his printing?” I asked.

“Yup. I can remember Grandpa workin’ down here, and all those little metal pieces of type. He did the church announcements and other things - birthdays and flyers fer raffles and what not.”

“Any other old printing stuff around?”

“Let’s see … this cabinet is part of it.” He pulled a tarp off a wooden cabinet and opened some drawers. Ding bats and type, wood furniture. Despite the tarp, a leaky window had dripped for decades and damaged one of the sides of the cabinet. But is was old hard wood, and still sturdy.

Lingering over the family treasures, the old guy seemed to dwell on old memories. Then he blurted, “Well, we got some type, some ruler things and gizmos here … whatever was for the printer is yours.”

Tom and I hauled the cabinet out of the basement ourselves – nine steps up, and tipped it into my pickup. I slid it toward the cab and roped it down.

Now I faced the main dilemma – moving the beast. I estimated it weighed about 1200 pounds. One strategy is to take it apart, which is not advisable due the likelihood of stuck gears and stubborn bolts. All advice was to definitely not fiddle with it, haul it straight out, if possible, and onto your truck.

I got my winch, chains, boards and rollers from my truck and started clearing a path to the stairs. Metal pipes would serve as rollers. Luckily it was already bolted to hard wood 2 x 4s. A heavy duty pry bar could be wedged under one of the leg supports, to lift the beast just high enough the get one of the rollers in on the corner. Then the other corner. Then the backside too. Once on rollers, you could push it pretty easy.

At the stairs, I chained it around and tied my winch around a tree outside. Then, downstairs, I pried the beast up to the first stair, yelling to Tom to crank the winch. We did this till it was angled up onto the stairs’ incline, tipping a bit precariously but in position. I climbed over and out the cellar, and slowly cranked the winch, one inch at a time. I climbed back into the cellar, and out again, back and forth, making sure it was clearing the steps. One false move, or broken chain, and its cast iron limbs would be shattered. As rain clouds blossomed and distant thunder threatened ominously, the iron beast rose slowly, slowly emerging from its cave of some sixty years.

An Old Style Gordon, 8 x 12 chase size, never motorized, with intact foot treadle. Nice. Complete, no breaks or welds. With the V-shape throw-off arm, so an early model. Probably about 1890. Letterpress printing, a dying art, replaced by offset in 50s, and computer laser printing in the 90s. But it was real printing, with metal type, impressing the page with the inked type, just like Gutenberg did over half a millennia ago in the 1450s.

Outside, the second challenge became apparent: Hoisting it up my wooden ramp into my pickup. “Wait a minute,” Tom said, and disappeared into the barn. A few minutes later a trench digger tractor emerged, with a big dump bucket on the front. “I see what you have in mind,” I said. “Let’s chain it up!”

Together, we strategically wrapped chains around the press and used the tractor’s bucket arms to lift the beast straight off the ground. I quickly back my pickup truck under it. Tom smiled at his ingenuity as he lowered it onto the bed. The rest was a mess of compression straps and ropes, a chore that always took me forever and made me feel like one of the Three Stooges, unraveling and retying endless knots. As the rain started plunking down, I bungeed a tarp all the way around. Wouldn’t want the beast to rust before we got home.

A couple hours of work, a few scraped knuckles, and it was mine. And $100. Tom had disappeared into the house. When he finally returned he handed me a book. A big old ATF type specimen book.

“Thanks, Tom,” I said.

“I was gonna scrap it,” he said. “But I just couldn’t bring myself to do it. Grandpa spent a lot of time with that machine. So I’m glad I found someone to use it.”

I waved as I pulled slowly away, with a 15-hour drive in front of me. Yeah, these old machines were discarded and scrapped wholesale in the 70s. But you still find a few around. Thank God for guys like Tom (and Craigslist), who make an effort to get them placed in caring hands. At 1200 pounds, he could have gotten $200 at the scrapper for it. ‘Course, you’d still have to haul that big old beautiful beast out of its cave. This is one beast that will live again, doing what it was born to do – press inked metal into paper and make books. Books that in all likelihood will far outlast digital printing.

(c) John Major Jenkins. Read more about his work: http://alignment2012.com/OakRootPress.html

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Only one thing was missing

9800 feet on a cool day with the smell of sage pungent in the air. This past weekend, board members Tom Parson, Marc Silberman and Patti Parson were at Como Roundhouse, the last remaining stone narrow gauge roundhouse in Colorado, to print on a 12x15 C&P Gordon Old Style press and talk Depot talk.  We bonded over printing and railroads and vintage equipment with hundreds of people from the mountain communities, from Denver, from Wisconsin and Minnesota. And then there were two young women who had biked from Banff, and stopped on their way to the Mexico border!  Besides the C&P, there was a non-working Miehle Pony press used to print the Fairplay Flume. One last page still set up on a chase -  an announcement about burro races, with the band Zephy and appearances by Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky. What a frozen moment in time!

Oh  and the thing that was missing? A way to power the C&P.  No motor…that was ok. But no treadle either. All depended on an inexhaustible left arm on the flywheel, which Tom supplied. 

 

 

 

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Boy we had fun!

Our second meetup went 2 hours more than scheduled because the talk and beer kept flowing. Thanks to all who came and the friendly barfolk at Epic Brewing.

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Skyline at the Depot

Join us tomorrow morning at the depot for a visit with Sky Shipley of Skyline Type Foundry, 10 to noon, Thursday, June 29, 2016.

Returning from the Amalgamated Printers Association's annual Wayzgoose this week in St Louis, on his way back to the foundry in Prescott, Arizona, Sky has a truckload of beautiful newly cast printing type available!

His full catalog of type, ornaments, borders & initials is online at
https://skylinetype.com.

Skyline offers affordable fonts of the best metal printing type being cast today, including classic and modern designs and numerous extraordinary and rare 19th century typefaces. Questions and discussion welcome!

Englewood Letterpress Depot is located on the corner of West Dartmouth and South Galapago in Englewood, Colorado, just off Santa Fe Drive.

Rehabilitation of the historic depot as a Living Museum of Letterpress Printing, Typography, Design, Poetry & Art, and other projects of Englewood Depot, Inc, may be followed on our website www.letterpressdepot.com and on social media. 
For further info: 720.480.5358. 

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First MeetUp

It was great to see all those who came to our meetup, to hear new connections form over letterpress and design conversations, and to discover Our Mutual Friend Brewery   Two hours became four hours and still the talk went on.  We will definitely do this again!

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Getting to know us...

The Depot welcomes a host of new faces, experiences, and officers to our board. All of those involved are focused on community, art, design, history or printing.

Talking, planning, eating & more planning

Talking, planning, eating & more planning

Peter Bergman, an Assistant Professor of Communication Design at MSU Denver, who was been with the Depot project since the start, is our new president. Jason Wedekind, a stalwart board member and principal of Genghis Kern Design and Letterpress has taken on the role of Vice President. Brad Hammond, a Certified fraud examiner at CBIZ HMH, LLC, is our new treasurer. Other new board members include; Alexandra Jimenez, program director at the Platte Forum; Kim Morski, printmaker and artist book maker; Mike Ruberto, a Professor in the Multimedia Graphic Design department at Front Range Community College; Marc Silberman, a printer with strong philatelic bent; and Ian Van Mater, a MAC expert at Apple.

Staying with us are Alicita Rodriguez, Wilson Thomas, executive director Tom Parson and secretary Patti Parson.

We are forever grateful to those board members who are leaving – Lonnie Smith, David Ashley, Karen Jones and Jimi Bernath – for all the support they have provided and continue to do so.    

 

 

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Inking it up at a student workshop

Students from Front Range Community College got to learn about letterpress while designing their own business cards.  Depotians and master printers Tom Parson and Peter Bergman lent a hand in the Metro State University of Denver print shop, as did their teacher Mike Ruberto, who also is on the Depot board.  Spreading the word about letterpress and getting ink on everyone's hands is in the DNA of the Letterpress Depot - so we look forward to leading more workshops.  Email us for details: englewooddepot@gmail.com

 

 

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WWBD workshop

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WWBD workshop

The WWBD workshop - What Would Brad Vetter Do - was a weekend of pressure plate printing, wood type, ice cream (in honor of Hamilton) and a lot of fun. A $200 level perk for the Pressing On film, it brought people from around the country to Denver.  Jason Wedekind, Tom Parson and Jeff Shepherd filled in for Brad at Genghis Kern. Slideshow of the printers and their work below.

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20 Steps to a Christmas card and the joy of letterpress!

After taking workshops with the Depot, German Murillo  of the Antique Photography Studio wrote two wonderful blogs 

 Treats for the holidays!

 

 

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Photopolymers and letterpress

Letterpress printing does not always have to begin with metal type.  If you have a fragile type you don't want to wear out, if you want to use a computer-generated font, if you have a large amount of type to set and your composing stick hand is tired, you can use photopolymer plates.  Above a student in a Depot workshop is washing out the plate after it has been exposed. To see the whole process check out Tom Parson's pictures on Flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/79988210@N00/sets/72157647162502923/ or call him to schedule an individual workshop 720-480-5358.

 

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Vandercook Session

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Vandercook Session

The Vandercook press was the center of attention at the second session of the Depot's Traveling Workshop held at Metro State University of Denver. Tom Parson (above) and Peter Bergman (in slideshow below) worked with  Victoria Adams-Kotsch, Megan Duffy, Cristy Fernandez, Emily Lennon, German Murillo, Bradley Wacjman and Jen Wisler. 

Interested in workshops? volunteering? landscaping? donating?  email us at englewooddepot@gmail.com

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We're picking up steam  - come along for the ride

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We're picking up steam - come along for the ride

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Woohoo we’re official! This week we received final confirmation from IRS that the Letterpress Depot is a non profit –a 501(c)(3).  We’ve been “pending” since November. That means all donations to us are now officially tax deductible to the full extent allowed by law.  Thanks to Executive Director Tom Parson for tackling the application, and our wonderful active board for helping see it all through: President Lonnie Smith; Vice-President Jason Wedekind; board members David Ashley, Peter Bergman, Jim Bernath, Karen Jones, and Wilson Thomas, and me, the secretary and blogger.

But we could use some extra hands and heads.  We are looking for someone familiar with accounting (CPA?) who could volunteer some time.  And an affordable licensed contractor who would like to work on a project such as the Depot.  Not to mention some help on lawn maintenance as needed (Lonnie and wife Sandy, Wilson, Tom and I have all been down with the grass and the weeds—thanks!)

In other news, the traveling workshop has started (for some pix from that, click on Workshops at the top of the page).  And Tom and Patti just came back from the ATF Conference in Salem, New Hampshire. No, that’s not an Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms reunion but rather the American Typecasting Fellowship (a nod to the American Type Founders of past renown).  It’s a biannual gathering of all those interested in type- and line-casting and it was just a fascinating bunch to be with.  Frank Romano, director of the Museum of Printing in North Andover, Massachusetts was the generous host, and ATF founder and guiding spirit Rich Hopkins regaled the crowd with tales of how he acquired all his casters. There was  one particularly gruesome image of old monotype casters being forklifted into dumpsters when Rich couldn’t fit all 12 being discarded into his pickup—or his shop.  Frank and Rich also had a lively duel on monotype versus linotype: their expertise also clear in their  gorgeous books – Rich’s Tolbert Lanston and the Monotype (http://bit.ly/1wzriQp) and Frank’s History of the Linotype Company  (http://amzn.to/1pd7JJS) - two must-haves for anyone interested in printing and type history. These will be in our depot library collection!

Also speaking at the conference - Frank Brannon of Speakeasy Press who has been working with Ed Rayher of Swamp Press to cast type of the Cherokee language.  Frank came across a syllabary of the language that Sequoyah created in 1821 and it became his life’s passion to get it cast and spread the knowledge. Ed took up the challenge. Now it is being used in North Carolina to pass on the language as well as the art of printing.

Two apprentices from M&H Type —Mark Sagianis and Chris Godek – told of their adventures being thrown into the world of casting.  The apprentices there have to commit to 4 years at minimum wage, and then they are expected to stay on afterwards.  Their enthusiasm and sheer joy about their work was infectious. 

Greg Walters of Piqua, Ohio described the challenges of casting 120 point type Cloister Initials on a huge pivotal caster obtained at the American Type Founders auction in 1993; Stan Nelson(formerly with the Smithsonian) described and demonstrated his molds for hand-casting type; Bill Welliver gave a full update on his system for computer interface with the Monotype composition caster - there were talks on just about every type of casting equipment, a swap meet and auction, endless delicious food (including one unforgettable 5 course Italian dinner) and connections with wonderful typenuts all around the world. 

Below: Gary Gregory who prints as Ben at the Old North Church; George Hamilton who flew in from Austria; Bill Welliver with slides of his work; Stan Nelson and Rich Hopkins; Tom, Gary, and Stan; and  Sky Shipley and some of the fonts he has cast at Skyline Type Foundry.





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Fun & Printing during Cherry Creek Arts Festival

Guys with memories of 9th grade shop classes, people who were taken with the precision and just plain cuteness of the Curtis & Mitchell Columbian No. 1 press, children wide-eyed at seeing their prints emerge from the small Vandercook proof press, and those who know and admire the Depot building,  all came to watch Tom print in a tent in front of Tam O'Neill Fine Arts Gallery during the Festival.   More Saturday 1-4 and Sunday 10-1.  Thanks to Karen Jones and Wilson Thomas for all their help.


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